4 Swoon-Worthy Places to Go in Washington DC: A Rainy Day Guide

A Rainy Day Guide in Washington DC

It may be a rainy day in your gorgeous city lined with Japanese cherry trees, monuments, and the wide Potomac River, but the thrills of the nation’s capital never cease.

We are here to seep into the secret corners of Washington D.C. that give a little spark of mystery to your rainy days in the city.

So head out of your Cathedral Heights apartment, put on your detective hat and thinking cap, grab your umbrella and raincoat; we’re going archive hopping! What will you search for?

The National Archives are our first stop on the list of libraries to visit. Congress established the archives in 1934 to hold all original government documents; we’re talking primary sources. Primary source documents are the very originals, no tricks, no skips just pure paperwork from thousands of government officials, historical figures, and trying times that define this nation.

 You can take a journey across time by exploring the diaries, documents, and drafts from citizens, military, world influencers, and government officials over the face of history.  Buy reproductions of old American commercials, speeches, and events from the archive records of microfilm.

Reach into your own military records if you or a family member served in the Nations armed forces.  Next, journey through any of the National Archive tours and explore exhibits on display about things like the women’s right to vote through original document records and photographs. 

These documents tell the real tale of the American journeymen and women who formed our nation today. Hit the information at the source, and form your own opinion based on what you find.  You will love doing some detective work on all the topics that intrigue your inner child, so put on your rain boots and go play among the shelves of history. 

The Library of Congress was first established in 1800 after the capital of the United States moved from Philadelphia to your home city, Washington D.C. It marks the oldest cultural institution initiated by the federal government in the country.

The original Capital building which the first Library of Congress held its archives in was set ablaze by British troops in 1814. Yikes! Over 3000 volumes were lost in time, but the story doesn’t end there.

Thomas Jefferson replaced the Library with his own collection, which was double the size and sold for the price of $24,000. That’s equivalent to almost $487,000 in today’s dollars.

This collection was worth every penny, and you can go see it today, run your fingers across the shelves of past, and explore the architecture which holds collected works from the mature of times.

Today the Library of Congress has expanded to cover a total of three buildings which occupy Capital Hill.

 #Tweet about it. The library houses extensive collections of old maps, sheet music, motion pictures, magazines, and photographs. There are over 70 billion manuscripts among these vast archives. Okay, we get it, you might need a rainy lifetime to cover this one. But if you do stop by we highly recommend viewing some of our Nation’s great treasures like a handwritten copy of Thomas Jefferson’s original rough draft of the Declaration of Independence- how alluring!

Did you know that the Jefferson Building, the John Adams Building, and the James Madison Memorial Building hold over 150 million items. Of those, 36 million are books and printed materials that speak for over 470 languages. Who even knew that many existed?! #WashingtonDC #DidYouKnow? #DCfunfact

Not many people know, but the National Gallery of Art also contains a library, not just a showcase of amazing artworks from around the world!

The Gallery East Building

Speaking of the globe, worldwide scholars do hop on a plane and head to the hidden berth of archives in this gem. This seven-story stack of books lies in the Gallery’s East Building.

Along with microforms, catalogs, and image assemblage, this library contains over 400,000 rare texts and periodicals that artists quest over.

Head there to see some paintings and expand your knowledge at the source of history and the masters themselves who defined and shaped what we know today as an art form around the map.

Art libraries are spectacular sources of inspiration and imagination, and the Folger Shakespeare Library seriously agrees with this statement. Thus they have invested 50 million big bucks into the renovation of their archival source.

Among all the incredible literature lies an entire archive of the world’s most extensive William Shakespeare works. The library which sits atop Capitol Hill opened in 1932 and was established by Henry Clay Folger.

 

Coming Your way in 2020

You can save your boots and umbrellas for a rainy day at the beginning of 2020 after the multi-million dollar renovations have been completed.

Head to the Folger Shakespeare Theatre for pop-culture events during the week, and but of course the stage. And in the meantime, enjoy our favorite Shakespeare quote:

“All the world's a stage, and all the men and women merely players: they have their exits and their entrances, and one man in his time plays many parts, his acts being seven ages.”

Here Comes the Sun

The rain will end, and as the sun rises in the East, you will feast upon the knowledge and excitement given to you on a rainy day in Washington, D.C.

The colossal collections of archives at the National Archives, Library of Congress, National Gallery of Art Library, and the Folger Shakespeare Library will submit all audiences to a vast array of insights.

You can explore the world and all of its mysteries in Washington DC from the past right outside your Daro Apartment doorstep.

Remember the world is your stage, don’t let the rainy days cage you in, take advantage and seek out the inner crevices of our nation’s capital that excite you most, gather your own ideas about them, and then tweet @daromanagement in thanks- have a lovely day!

Explore more attractions in Washington, DC!

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